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tips for nanniesVisit our Resource Center for a wealth of information for both Families and Nannies.

Testimonials

Our time with Debbie was brief, but positive in every way. We originally sent her email wherein she responded that same day. We then met her at my office for an interview. She made such an impression that we invited her to have a playdate with my children, who are 2 and 6 years old. We have had nannies for our children for over 6 years and have seen the good and the bad. She was actually the first nanny we invited to meet them after having spoken to and met approximately 35 other nannies. When she arrived at our house, she immediately took an interest in the children. She was very attentive and asked questions to see how we would like her to care for our children. Following the playdate, we offered her a full-time nanny position with our family. At her first day and each day thereafter she was punctual, pleasant, couteous, professional and respectful. The children were her priority. Through no fault of her own, our prior nanny (who had been with us for 1 1/2 years) advised that she was no longer relocating (which was the reason we were looking for a nanny). After much consideration, we felt it was best for the children to be with the nanny they had known. During our brief time with Debbie, it was truly a pleasure to have her in our house and as our nanny. Please feel free to contact us with any questions. Sincerely, Stacy


Stacy,Delray Beach, FL

Book List

100 tips for nanniesThe advice in this book comes from Candi Wingate, President of Nannies4hire.com.

The Nanny Factor bookThe latest book from Candi offers more valuable advice for nannies and families.

The following article by Candi Wingate were published on PsychologyToday.com.

Cost-Effective Summer Childcare Options

School is out, and the search for child care is on! The challenge most parents face is finding quality care for your child that fits within your budget. Here are some cost-effective child care options that won't break the bank.

  • Hire a Babysitter or Nanny
    Nannies are no longer exclusive to the wealthy. If you have two children in full time daycare you can afford a nanny, and sites like Nannies4Hire cut out the high-priced fee of nanny agency. Whether you need a full time nanny or part time babysitter, trusted online sources provide a massive database of local care providers at your fingertips. You can find candidates quickly based on your personal requirements and budget
  • It Takes a Village
    There are likely multiple families in your neighborhood with young children. Get with these other parents and arrange shared childcare, in which two or more households take turns attending to the children. Parents might need to take time off work during their turn, but it should be minimal as other households are rotating turns as well.
  • Go Back to College
    College students on summer break are ideal candidates for child care. They can be recruited through the on-campus career centers or through a parent network in your community. Many will be looking for jobs as resume builders, so their pay expectations might be lower for that purpose, and their schedules are typically very flexible during the summer months.
  • It's all Relative
    Enlisting the help of a relative this summer can be a win-win for everyone. Whether it is a teenage cousin or beloved grandma, your children can enjoy some quality bonding time. Your relative may not accept payment, but you should certainly offer. Treat him/her as you would a hired care provider: Negotiate pay, respect their schedule, keep lines of communication open, and be direct in your expectations.
  • Summer School
    It's true that kids deserve a break from the intense learning schedules of the school year, but there is no reason the learning must stop completely. Half-day summer school can be a great option to keep your child mentally engaged. Summer schools may be available through your child's regular school, an alternative school, civic organizations, or churches.
  • Summer Day Camp
    Affordable day camps can range in activities from sports and science to fine arts. Local options might include science museums, arts centers, YMCA/YWCA, Boys & Girls Club, city parks & recreation, and nearby colleges where the Early Education students can gain experience working with children.
  • Volunteer
    City recreational departments often offer a volunteer program for kids 13 and over. Volunteer opportunities can include office work, recreational centers, aquatics, senior citizens, and children's summer programs. These volunteer programs are a unique way for kids to explore career opportunities, give back to the community, and receive school credit.

You might find that a combination of these options is most efficient and cost-effective. Take your time in selecting the option(s) that works best for your family and budget, and enjoy your summer!